Category Archives: ETL510

Concluding comments from Roy and others at the close of Library & Info Week

May 31 saw the close of another week of library advocacy in Australia hosted by the Australian Library & Information Association (ALIA). The theme for Library and Information Week 2009 was Libraries your passport to discovery!, which was a great opportunity for our information profession to promote the value of libraries in today’s society. I noticed Sue Hutley‘s (Executive Director, ALIA) statement that “libraries offer every Australian a chance to discover, access and connect to a much wider world – and in these tough economic times, it’s a lot cheaper too!”, was a message that resonated through a number of comments in the media this week, including those of Robert McEntyre (Public Libraries NSW Metropolitan Association Executive Director) in the Herald article Book now: libraries are top shelf in family attractions by Rachel Browne (on May 31).

It was also great to see  the words of Roy Crotty (fellow studentslearn blogger, President of ASLANSW and Associate Lecturer with us at the School of Information Studies at Charles Sturt University – love the concluding quote in the article Roy:

“If anything, the digital era has made a teacher librarian’s job even more relevant.”

The ALIA media release highlights the cultural, educational and economic benefits to society afforded by libraries and information agencies, noting that each year “Australia’s 1,500 public libraries lend over 178 million items to 12 million registered borrowers” which is over half of Australia’s population. Additional figures quoted by Sue Huntley provide the public with an idea of the breadth of library services across the nation including “approximately 9,000 school libraries, 42 university libraries, 387 TAFE campus libraries, and thousands of health libraries, law libraries and other special libraries.” In addition, the Herald article Students can borrow to boost chances outlining public libraries’ support of school children’s reading habits through the provision of multiple copies of books on the Premier’s Challenge reading list each year, demonstrates how public libraries are ‘switched on’ to the needs of kids and in supporting school libraries to resource public programs that can sometimes be beyond the capabilities of an individual school library’s budget. 

Sherman Young’s article Is the book dead? published on ABC’s Unleashed on May 26 and National Simultaneous Storytime on May 27 capped off a busy week for libraries, authors, publishers and booksellers in promoting the value of libraries, books, reading and literacy for all Australians.

An interesting antidote to the good work presented in the media this past week about the value of libraries in Australia, can be found in ABC’s Unleashed article The vulgar modernisation of our libraries (published at the end of April) is you missed it. Love to hear your feedback on any or all of the above!

Shh, this is a digital library

This is a link to an article in the Times Online e-publication about what it means to be a librarian in this modern age. One of the people mentioned, Dr Gaynor Eyre, was member of the CSU staff for 5 years. I am so pleased I no longer have to put my hair in a tightly twisted bun.

“Once upon a time a love of books and reading was considered a key requirement for an aspiring librarian. Today, with the advent of digitalisation and moves towards the virtual library, such an interest is no longer enough. Librarians must master sophisticated IT and information management skills as well as the traditional techniques.

Bookishness has gone – along with the old stereotype of stern shushes from a bluestocking in a tweed skirt and spectacles with her hair in a tightly twisted bun.”

Read more at:

http://business.timesonline.co.uk/tol/business/career_and_jobs/article6154172.ece

NLA Innovative Ideas Forum 2009

Yesterday I attended the National Library of Australia’s Innovative Ideas Forum 2009. The theme for this year’s forum was “The value and significance of social networking for cultural institutions”. I really appreciated the diversity of the program. Marcus Gillezeau’s (Producer/Director, Firelight Productions) presentation on the social phenomenon of Scorched.tv (cross platform tele-movie feature on Channel 9 in August 2008) really challenged me in terms of the power of social networking and an increasing blurring of the lines between fiction and reality in a world where info-consumers become info-producers.  At the end of the day as I debriefed with some friends, trying to ‘unpack’ the many complexities of Scorched as 21stC all-media storytelling, comparisons to the War of the Worlds radio play was noted a number of times!

The sessions by Dr Anne Summers (Author and Columnist),  Mark Scott (Managing Director, ABC), Rose Holley (Manager, Australian Newspapers Digitisation Program, NLA), Darren Sharp (Senior Consultant, Collabforge) and  Jo Kay (Freelance Geek, Designer,Facilitator, Second Lifer) all addressed in some way, the impact of social networking on our lives, both personally and as information professionals.

The National Library also encouraged audience participation using Web 2.0 tools throughout the day… it was great to see people tweeting on their laptops and mobile phones, uploading photos in Flickr and recording ideas and responses on their blogs. Keep your eye on NLA’s iif2009 website for the vidcasts and podcasts of each session. Darren Sharp’s presentation Library 2.0: Citizens Co-Creating Culture has just been made available. These will be great resources for all CSU TL students to visit, esp. ETL401, ETL411, ETL523 and INF5XX (the new social networking subject for 2010 that I have yet to write!).

This is the fourth year that the NLA has hosted an innovation forum. I am already looking forward to seeing the draft of the 2010 program!

ASLA & ALIA release new & revised policy statements for school libraries

Whooa…hooo… I’m really excited to see today’s release of (some) new and revised policy statements on the Australian School Library Association website. Information policies are cool!This is hot-off-the-press today!

Congratulations to the Australian School Library Association and Australian Library and Information Association collaborative effort that has resulted in new policy statements such on guided inquiry and the curriculum, school libraries & ICT and revised statements on resource-based learning and information literacy just to name a few.  

The TLship academic team here at Charles Sturt University frequently refer our students to these national policy statements and guidelines throughout our Graduate Certificate and Masters courses in teacher librarianship. I’m particularly impressed with the new policy statement design which includes explicit links of each policy statement to both ASLA and ALIA objectives. Thank you to both associations for continuing to provide Australia’s teacher librarians with such professional leadership.

New information policies for TLs… thanx ASLA/ALIA!