Category Archives: ETL506

NLA Innovative Ideas Forum 2009

Yesterday I attended the National Library of Australia’s Innovative Ideas Forum 2009. The theme for this year’s forum was “The value and significance of social networking for cultural institutions”. I really appreciated the diversity of the program. Marcus Gillezeau’s (Producer/Director, Firelight Productions) presentation on the social phenomenon of Scorched.tv (cross platform tele-movie feature on Channel 9 in August 2008) really challenged me in terms of the power of social networking and an increasing blurring of the lines between fiction and reality in a world where info-consumers become info-producers.  At the end of the day as I debriefed with some friends, trying to ‘unpack’ the many complexities of Scorched as 21stC all-media storytelling, comparisons to the War of the Worlds radio play was noted a number of times!

The sessions by Dr Anne Summers (Author and Columnist),  Mark Scott (Managing Director, ABC), Rose Holley (Manager, Australian Newspapers Digitisation Program, NLA), Darren Sharp (Senior Consultant, Collabforge) and  Jo Kay (Freelance Geek, Designer,Facilitator, Second Lifer) all addressed in some way, the impact of social networking on our lives, both personally and as information professionals.

The National Library also encouraged audience participation using Web 2.0 tools throughout the day… it was great to see people tweeting on their laptops and mobile phones, uploading photos in Flickr and recording ideas and responses on their blogs. Keep your eye on NLA’s iif2009 website for the vidcasts and podcasts of each session. Darren Sharp’s presentation Library 2.0: Citizens Co-Creating Culture has just been made available. These will be great resources for all CSU TL students to visit, esp. ETL401, ETL411, ETL523 and INF5XX (the new social networking subject for 2010 that I have yet to write!).

This is the fourth year that the NLA has hosted an innovation forum. I am already looking forward to seeing the draft of the 2010 program!

ASLA & ALIA release new & revised policy statements for school libraries

Whooa…hooo… I’m really excited to see today’s release of (some) new and revised policy statements on the Australian School Library Association website. Information policies are cool!This is hot-off-the-press today!

Congratulations to the Australian School Library Association and Australian Library and Information Association collaborative effort that has resulted in new policy statements such on guided inquiry and the curriculum, school libraries & ICT and revised statements on resource-based learning and information literacy just to name a few.  

The TLship academic team here at Charles Sturt University frequently refer our students to these national policy statements and guidelines throughout our Graduate Certificate and Masters courses in teacher librarianship. I’m particularly impressed with the new policy statement design which includes explicit links of each policy statement to both ASLA and ALIA objectives. Thank you to both associations for continuing to provide Australia’s teacher librarians with such professional leadership.

New information policies for TLs… thanx ASLA/ALIA!
 

Effective TLs as mavens, connectors & salesmen… which one are you?

In his book, The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference (2000), author Malcolm Gladwell identifies three types of people who can make a difference: mavens, connectors, and salesmen.

US school library media specialist, Peggy Milam Creighton builds on the ideas of Gladwell in her School Library Media Activities Monthly article, Impact as a 21st-Century Library Media Specialist (2008).

She explores Gladwell’s 3 types in terms of the qualities and behaviours of exemplary teacher librarians.  Creighton’s article also challenges TLs to harness a range of Web 2.0 technologies to leverage themselves as ‘mavens, connectors and salesmen’. How do Creighton’s ideas inform your vision of what a teacher librarian ‘looks like’? 
To which do you aspire?

Keeping Informed

At the recent workshops and on forum postings several people have mentioned that they are ‘new’ to ICTs and 10-thingseverything associated with technology. There is certainly a lot to learn and no central repository of knowledge that we can tap into that has everything. It is up to us as individuals to to do what we can to keep abreast of new ideas. It is something that both Lyn and I must do in our roles also.

Often the newspapers have sections that outline the newest and latest ideas and gadgets. I have included a link below to an article in today’s SMH (probably also in The Age) that may be useful.

Keep your eye on the IT sections of the major newspapers, and especially the IT section of The Australian, for news and views.